Samsung Just Patented This Unique Phone With 4-Sided Curved Screen

Samsung Just Patented This Unique Phone With 4-Sided Curved Screen

Samsung, in its efforts to reinforce its dominant position in the world of smartphones, is trying to come up with innovative and out of the box ideas for its flagships. Where the mid-range phones are kept generic, the flagship phones are anything but.

A patent titled, ‘Electronic device with full display’ was filed by Samsung in September 2018 and was published publicly last week on 6th June 2019. Knowing how far in advance Samsung plans its flagships, there are rumors the patent is for the upcoming Samsung Galaxy S11.
Samsung has been rolling out phones with two curved sides for a while now, but this time, it wants to make all the sides curved. This takes us back to Huawei Honor magic which rolled out in 2016 with all four sides curved. In Samsung’ case, they’ve kept the bezels thin and are looking forward to achieving an all-screen design.
Patent

Samsung has highlighted the process of achieving a 3D curved display in detail. The images in the patent-speak for themselves.
We are looking at a rounded smartphone with a flat display around the center and four curved display modules on the sides.

Another thing to notice here is the curved back which makes the thickness of the phone non-homogenous. The phone will be thick in the center and gets thinner towards the edges.
Coming to the cameras, Samsung has not hopped on to the pop-up selfie camera bandwagon but has concealed the selfie camera inside the curved display. The camera will be placed at an angle inside the display to prevent image distortion due to the curved sides.

We don’t see a fingerprint sensor on the patent, hence, it’s only logical that it will be inside the display as well. Apart from this, the diagram shows a dual-sensor rear camera and a single button on the side.

Since we did not get much of an upgrade in Samsung Galaxy S10, it looks like Samsung is gearing up for introducing a 3D curved display in the upcoming S11. The final design may differ from diagrams in the patent so take it with a grain of salt.

Updated: February 17, 2020 — 5:20 am

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